Epilepsy in the workplace

Advertisement

Heading

Approximately 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy yet many employers know very little about this condition and how to manage employees who suffer from it. Dionne Kerr talks about the symptoms, treatment and affects of epilepsy.


Advertisement

 


Epilepsy is a common and diverse set of chronic neurological disorders characterised by seizures. About 50 million people worldwide have the condition and 90% of cases occur in developing countries.
People with disabilities often have the potential to be valued employees and Siyakha Consulting, transformation drivers in the South African workplace, urge employers to consider giving all people a chance to become active participants in the local economy.
To this end, the company focuses each month on a disability that employers would do well in becoming a little more familiar with.
For people who are diagnosed with Epilepsy, the condition is usually controlled with medication. The majority of people find that with modern medication they are able to control their seizures well. However, over 30% of people with the condition do not have seizure control, even with medication. Surgery may be considered in difficult cases.

When investigating the causes of seizures, it is important to understand physiological conditions that may predispose the individual to a seizure occurrence. Clinical and experimental data has implicated the failure of blood-brain barrier function in triggering chronic or acute seizures. Other studies implicate the interactions between a common blood protein. These findings suggest that acute seizures are a predictable consequence of disruption of the blood-brain barrier, through either artificial or inflammatory mechanisms.
How is Epilepsy diagnosed?
The diagnosis of epilepsy usually requires that the seizure occur spontaneously. Nevertheless, certain epilepsy syndromes require particular precipitants or triggers for seizures to occur and employees openly talking about their condition with a receptive supervisor can help prevent attacks.
"People with epilepsy should be judged on their skills, experience and qualifications. With a little compromise, they could go on to become valuable members of your team," says Dionne Kerr, executive director of Siyakha Consulting.
As legendary South African cricketer Jonty Rhodes, who has epilepsy, says, "There is nothing disabling about the condition."
* You can get much more information from the organisation Epilepsy South Africa - Click here for their website

Advertisement


Advertisement


Advertisement


Google News


Advertisement i




Advertisement m