How To Deal With Rejection That Comes With Unemployment

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When you're unemployed and on the job hunt, along with sending out job applications comes rejections. Getting these rejections aren't always the best feeling and could demotivate you.


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If you have ever received a rejection letter from a prospective employer you know that rejection can be tough, but its not the end of the world.

If you are looking for employment you have probably experienced what it's like to be unsuccessful in your job application.

While it can feel like you are being singled out as 'unemployable', rejection in the job market is actually a common occurrence according to career strategist, Jeanine Tanner O'Donnell.

It's not just happening to you its happening to millions and millions of people.

O'Donnell says that people who have been rejected shouldn’t take it personally. “Most of the time what's happened is that there was just a better fit.”

Job seekers can become particularly discouraged and even frustrated when they don't hear anything after an interview. Again this is not unusual in the business world.

The reason for this is that employers see themselves as “buying a service” and don't believe they need to personally respond to every unsuccessful applicant. “They are not going to notify everyone, they don't feel its necessarily their responsibility...”

In addition people, even interviewers tend to avoid the awkwardness and discomfort of rejecting others.”...they don't like the idea of letting someone down.”

Instead of becoming resentful towards a company who has rejected you, “you should try to nurture that relationship.” You can do this by asking the interviewer to keep you in mind for any future job vacancies. This shows maturity and character and helps to position you for the next available job.

Being rejected can also provide an opportunity to learn about yourself and improve in your weak areas. Not every company is going to explain why they didn't choose you. But if you show a willingness to continue the relationship you are more likely to receive constructive feedback, says O'Donnell.

If possible try to connect with people in the organisation and make as many friends as you can. According to the statistics”over 80% of all jobs are gotten via referral.” Don't let one rejection stop your from seizing other opportunities.

Whatever you do, “don't give up”. According to O'Donnell 70% of people who get rejected from a company never apply there again.

Always remember, “the company said no not today, they didn't say no not ever.”


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