Skills and employment go hand in hand

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In today's labour market, high youth unemployment paradoxically co-exists
with the unmet demand for skilled jobs. Laura Brewer an ILO Specialist in
skills
for youth employment discusses the worrying statistics relating to youth
unemployment around the world.


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In today's labour market, high youth unemployment paradoxically co-exists with
the unmet demand for skills jobs.
Laura Brewer an ILO Specialist in Skills for Youth Employment discusses the
worrying statistics relating to youth unemployment around the world.

The global figures show that at least 74 million young people are
unemployed, which is more than three times the number of unemployed adults.

About 6 million youths have stopped looking for employment because they
have become so discouraged.
Globally there is a need to create 40 million jobs a year just to absorb entry
level market workers. While 200 million jobs need to be created worldwide to
fight the scourge of youth unemployment.
Disadvantaged youths face even greater difficulty in securing employment.
This group refers not only to youth who are "suffering from income poverty'.
These are young people who also experience discrimination based on gender,
disability or ethnicity.
Brewer explains that location can also be a barrier to finding employment.
However the primary impediment to youth employment is a lack of skills.
The solution is to improve the core work skills which includes the "ability to
communicate, team work skills, problem solving skills and learning to learn',
these are the skills that are needed in the current marketplace.
There has to be a focus to educate young people by providing good quality
education and training.
Research also shows that of the 200 million youths who are employed most
are only earning 2 dollars a day or less.

A 1 dollar investment in skills can have a 10 to 15 dollar increase in earning rate
which is good for the economic growth.
Finally since disadvantaged youths are more vulnerable they need to be
earning while learning because of their income poverty situation they come from,
you cannot just put them in a classroom and teach.

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