UCT Remains Alert After Exam Disruptions

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The University of Cape Town (UCT) condemned the actions of protestors who disrupted an examination session on Monday. In a video shared on social media, protesters can be seen entering an examination venue and throwing examination scripts to the floor. 


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UCT has described the disruption of the examination session, scheduled for 12:00 on Monday as an infringement on the rights of students. They explained that students are entitled to sit their mid-year exams in a conducive environment.

The university has revealed that protestors also tore up exam scripts of students who were being supported by UCT’s disability services in completing their exams. They added that the actions displayed during Monday’s disruption are not a legitimate protest.  

Charges of trespassing and malicious damage to property were made with the South African Police Service (SAPS) and an arrest was made on Monday afternoon. UCT explained their decision to call on the SAPS to come onto the campus was due to the importance of securing the exam venues and protecting the rights of students.

Students whose exams were disrupted will be informed of the re-sit times, including arrangements for those with particular support needs for completing their exams. The university said they remain alert for any trespassers attempting to come onto the campuses with ill intent.

Acting Vice-Chancellor Professor Sue Harrison said Monday's actions were deeply distressing and caused further unnecessary and unacceptable anxiety during an already stressful exam season.

“The behaviour demonstrated on Monday is not befitting of a university environment, which is a space for rational engagement, robust if necessary, but always civil and respectful of the rights of all”, said Harrison.

The university's Student Representative Council (SRC) has called for the halt of all university activities, pending the resolution of workers' grievances. They have asked students to be patient while the grievances of workers can be heard.

 

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