FAQ

Education FAQ

  • Non-accredited courses can still be useful, depending on your personal and professional goals.

    While accredited courses are typically more widely recognised and valued by employers and academic institutions, non-accredited courses can still offer valuable knowledge and skills that may be relevant to your field or interests.

    Non-accredited courses can be particularly useful for individuals who are looking to expand their knowledge in a particular area, develop a new hobby or interest, or gain practical skills that may not be covered in traditional academic programmes. They can also be a more affordable and accessible option for individuals who may not have the time or resources to pursue a full degree or accredited programme.

    However, it's important to note that the quality and rigour of non-accredited courses can vary widely. Some non-accredited courses may be taught by experienced professionals and offer practical, hands-on learning experiences, while others may lack academic rigour or may not be taught by qualified instructors.

    Before enrolling in a non-accredited course, it's important to research the course provider and read reviews or testimonials from previous students. It's also a good idea to consider the relevance of the course content to your personal or professional goals, and to evaluate the cost and time commitment required for the course.

  • According to South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA), short learning programmes in South Africa are not registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF); hence they do not have NQF levels.

    Short courses are designed to improve or refresh knowledge and skills in a particular field and for personal, social or professional development.

    There are many reputable institutions in South Africa that offer short courses, including universities, colleges, and private training providers. Many of these courses are designed to provide practical skills and knowledge that are relevant to specific industries or professions.

    In some cases, short courses may be accredited by a professional or regulatory body, which can provide additional recognition and validation of the quality and relevance of the course.

    It's important to do research before enrolling in a short course to ensure that it is recognised and valued in the relevant field or industry. Students can do this by checking the accreditation status of the institution or training provider, researching the course content and syllabus and reading reviews or testimonials from previous students.

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Education FAQ

  • es, it is possible to rewrite your Matric exams after more than 5 years. In South Africa, there are several options available for individuals who wish to improve their Matric results or obtain their Matric certificate later in life. Here are some of the options available:

    • Full-time studies: You can enroll in a full-time Matric course at a high school or college, which will prepare you to rewrite your Matric exams.
    • Part-time studies: You can also enroll in part-time Matric courses, which are designed for working individuals or those who cannot attend full-time classes. These courses are offered by various educational institutions and allow you to study at your own pace.
    • Distance learning: You can also study Matric through distance learning institutions, which offer study materials and support via mail, email, or online platforms.
    • Self-study: If you prefer to study on your own, you can purchase Matric study guides and textbooks and prepare for the exams independently.

    It's important to note that there are certain age restrictions for writing the Matric exams as a private candidate. According to the Department of Basic Education in South Africa, private candidates who are 21 years or older may only register for the Matric exams if they meet certain criteria. These criteria include having attempted Matric exams before or having obtained a General Education and Training Certificate (GETC) or equivalent qualification.

    In summary, you can rewrite your Matric exams after more than 5 years through various study options, including full-time studies, part-time studies, distance learning, and self-study. However, there may be age restrictions for private candidates, so it's important to check with the Department of Basic Education for the latest requirements and guidelines.

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  • To pay and renew your vehicle license online in the Western Cape, you can follow these steps:

    1. Check your renewal notice: You should receive a renewal notice in the mail or via email before your vehicle license expires. The notice will indicate the amount you need to pay and the due date.
    2. Visit the e-Services portal: Go to the Western Cape Government's e-Services portal at https://www.westerncape.gov.za and click on the "Renew Vehicle License" option.
    3. Enter your details: You will need to enter your vehicle license number, ID number and the renewal amount as indicated on your renewal notice.
    4. Confirm your details: Check that all the information entered is correct and click on the "Pay Now" button.
    5. Choose your payment method: You can pay using a credit card, Instant EFT or a debit card with a Mastercard or Visa logo.
    6. Make payment: Follow the prompts to complete the payment process.
    7. Download and print your license disc: Once payment is made, you will be able to download and print your license disc.

    Note that if your license has expired, you may be required to have your vehicle re-licensed and inspected before you can renew your license. It's best to check with the licensing office beforehand to ensure that you have all the necessary documentation and meet all the requirements.

     

  • To pay and renew your vehicle license in person in the Western Cape, you can follow these steps:

    1. Check your renewal notice: You should receive a renewal notice in the mail or via email before your vehicle license expires. The notice will indicate the amount you need to pay and the due date.
    2. Bring the necessary documents: When going to the licensing office, you will need to bring your renewal notice, your South African ID document and proof of address.
    3. Go to the licensing office: Visit your nearest licensing office or a post office that offers licensing services. You can find a list of licensing offices on the Western Cape Government website.
    4. Complete the renewal form: At the licensing office, you will need to complete a renewal form with your personal details, vehicle information and payment details.
    5. Pay the renewal fee: Once you have completed the renewal form, you will need to pay the renewal fee. Payment can be made in cash or by debit or credit card.
    6. Receive your license disc: After paying the renewal fee, you will receive a license disc for your vehicle. This disc should be displayed on the windshield of your vehicle.

    Note that if your license has expired, you may be required to have your vehicle re-licensed and inspected before you can renew your license. It's best to check with the licensing office beforehand to ensure that you have all the necessary documentation and meet all the requirements.

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  • In South Africa, you are required to register for income tax if you earn above a certain threshold. The threshold varies depending on your age and income, and it is updated annually by the South African Revenue Service (SARS).

    Currently, if you are under the age of 65 and earn a total income of more than R87,300 per year, or R7,275 per month, you are required to register for income tax. If you are 65 years or older, the threshold is higher, and you are only required to register if you earn more than R135,150 per year, or R11,263 per month.

    If you are self-employed or run a business, you are also required to register for income tax, regardless of your income level. This applies to sole proprietors, partnerships and companies.

    It's important to note that even if you earn below the income threshold, you may still want to consider registering for income tax. This is because if you are registered, you may be eligible for certain tax deductions, credits, and benefits, such as medical expenses, retirement annuities, and travel allowances.

    To register for income tax in South Africa, you can visit the SARS website and complete the relevant registration form online, or you can visit a SARS branch in person.

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    • Perform your duties: Your primary responsibility is to perform your duties to the best of your abilities and in a professional manner. This includes meeting the expectations of your job description, working efficiently and following the guidelines set forth by your employer.
    • Maintain good attendance: It's important to show up to work on time and be present when you are scheduled to work. Chronic absenteeism can negatively affect your employer's business and your job performance.
    • Adhere to company policies: You should be familiar with your employer's policies and procedures and adhere to them. This includes policies related to conduct, ethics, dress code, safety, and security.
    • Protect company assets: You should take steps to protect your employer's property, such as equipment, tools and intellectual property. You should also use company resources, such as the internet and office supplies, responsibly.
    • Maintain confidentiality: You should maintain confidentiality about company information, including trade secrets, customer information and other sensitive data. This includes not sharing information with unauthorised individuals or entities.
    • Foster a positive work environment: You should work cooperatively with your colleagues and maintain a positive work environment. This includes being respectful, communicating effectively and avoiding conflicts.
    • Continuously improve: You should strive to improve your skills and knowledge and stay up to date with industry trends and developments. This will not only benefit you but also your employer.

Labour Law FAQ

  • In South Africa, an employee is entitled to take any accumulated leave during their notice period, subject to the terms of their employment contract.

    If you wish to take leave during your notice period, you must first obtain approval from your employer. Your employer may require you to take your leave before or after your notice period, depending on their operational needs and the terms of your employment contract.

    It is important to note that if you take leave during your notice period, the leave days will be counted as part of your notice period, and you will still be required to fulfil the remainder of your notice period upon your return to work.

    Furthermore, if you have not accumulated sufficient leave to cover your desired leave period, your employer may require you to take unpaid leave for the remaining period or adjust your notice period accordingly.

    It is advisable to review your employment contract and discuss your leave options with your employer before making any plans to take leave during your notice period.

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Labour Law FAQ

  • If you resign from your job in South Africa, you may still be entitled to certain payments depending on the terms of your employment contract and the applicable labor laws.

    Firstly, you may be entitled to receive any outstanding salary, bonuses, or other benefits that are owed to you up until the date of your resignation. This includes any accumulated leave days that you have not taken, which must be paid out to you in accordance with the Basic Conditions of Employment Act.

    However, if you resign without giving your employer the required notice period as stipulated in your employment contract, your employer may be entitled to withhold a portion of your salary to compensate for the notice period that you failed to give. This is commonly referred to as a "notice pay deduction."

    Furthermore, if you contributed to the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) during your employment, you may be entitled to claim UIF benefits if you are unable to find new employment within a certain period after your resignation. However, you will need to meet certain eligibility requirements to qualify for UIF benefits.

    It is important to review your employment contract and understand your rights and obligations before resigning from your job in South Africa. It is also advisable to seek legal advice or consult with the Department of Labour if you have any concerns or questions about your entitlements upon resignation.

  • If you resign with immediate effect in South Africa, your employer is still required to pay out any outstanding salary, bonuses or other benefits that are owed to you up until the date of your resignation, including any accumulated leave days that you have not taken.

    However, if you resign without giving your employer the required notice period as stipulated in your employment contract, your employer may be entitled to withhold a portion of your salary to compensate for the notice period that you failed to give. This is commonly referred to as a "notice pay deduction."

    It's important to note that if you resign with immediate effect, your employer may not be able to accommodate your request to take leave days immediately. This is because your employer may require you to work during your notice period to ensure that there is sufficient handover of your duties and responsibilities to another employee or to ensure that the business operations are not disrupted.

    However, your employer may agree to pay out your leave days in cash, subject to the terms of your employment contract and the company's policies on the payment of leave. It's advisable to discuss this with your employer and review your employment contract before making any decisions to resign with immediate effect.

  • In South Africa, the notice period for termination of employment is governed by the Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA) and may vary depending on the length of service of the employee and the terms of their employment contract.

    The statutory notice periods for termination of employment in South Africa are as follows:

    • Employed for 6 months or less: No notice period is required.
    • Employed for more than 6 months but less than 1 year: 1 week's notice period is required.
    • Employed for 1 year or more: At least 4 weeks' notice period is required.

    However, it is important to note that an employment contract may provide for a longer notice period, and in such cases, the longer notice period will apply. Similarly, some collective agreements or bargaining council agreements may also provide for longer notice periods.

    If an employee is dismissed for misconduct, poor performance, or incapacity, the employer is not required to give notice. However, the dismissal must be in accordance with fair labor practices and the requirements of the Labour Relations Act.

    It is important to review your employment contract and the relevant legislation to ensure that you are aware of your rights and obligations regarding notice periods.

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