Youth Development

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Youth Development is essential to helping the youth of South Africa succeed in life. There are far more prospective workers than there are jobs available for them, and many youth are not able to afford to study further and become more specialised. This is where youth development programmes come in. Offering young people work readiness programmes, opportunities to advance their education and make a difference in their communities are just some of the ways that youth development can change South Africa for the better.


Although starting your own business can be risky, but it can also be rewarding if successful. Luckily, there are various initiatives that provide skills training and assistance to South Africa's budding entrepreneurs. 


Young South Africans aspire to do work that is both meaningful and fulfilling, according to the Frame Your Future survey recently conducted by SACAP (The South African College of Applied Psychology). 


Evolving technology and the impacts of Covid-19 have resulted in workplaces that are changing faster than ever. To keep pace with the rapid advances in the workplace and avoid skills shortages, almost half of employees will need to be reskilled with critical skills by 2025.


Volunteering can most certainly help you get a job. There is a growing trend among universities to produce graduates that are practically prepared for the workplace and fully equipped to lead in every sector.


Microsoft and non-profit social enterprise, Tech4Dev have partnered on the Women Techsters Initiative to train girls and women across Africa in coding and deep tech skills, aiming to bridge the digital and technology divide and ensure equal access to opportunities across the continent.


South Africa’s massive unemployment rate under its youth is currently estimated at around 52% and the percentage of youth absorbed into the formal economy is a mere 12.2%.


The newly launched Limpopo Youth Development Programme is set to change the lives of many young people in that province. 


A high employment rate, quality education, less teenage pregnancy and a place where children’s rights are not violated -- these are some of the dreams young South Africans have for a better country.


John Quincy Adams said that “if your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more…you are a leader.”


Once students enter university, they tend to be more experienced and confident about their career path and future employment prospects.

 

 


President Cyril Ramaphosa’s YES programme a positive step in the right direction, and well help allow the very necessary transfer of trade skills, improving unemployment and economy.


In the Eastern and Southern parts of Africa skills development initiatives are transforming the lives of unemployed youth.


Columba Leadership and M4JAM have created a scalable business model that aims to drive employment, education, and sustainable community development. The partnership addresses two of the most urgent challenges facing young South Africans: education and employment.


Gauteng government partnerships will provide thousands of young people with training and job opportunities while empowering them with the relevant skills needed in the job market.


Much has been said about young people and their prospects for the future. As we celebrate Youth month it seems appropriate to look at some of the defining traits and characteristics of this tech- savvy generation.


Government is investing in education and skills development because it’s the most
powerful weapons that the youth will need to enable them to run the country's
modern economy efficiently.


Failing to address the emergency of youth unemployment is a powder keg waiting to
explode. We all need to address this crisis urgently, if we wish to have a stable
country going forward.


Research shows that young people are three times more likely to be unemployed. The
African Economic Outlook 2012 report concurs that youth unemployment figures will
increase unless Africa moves swiftly to make youth employment a priority.

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