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Millions of South Africans rely on social grants distributed by the South African Social Security Agency (Sassa). It is estimated that the agency serves as much as 46% of the country’s population.

 


Social grants ensure that millions of South Africans receive some financial support from the government. A recent announcement by the Department of Social Development (DSD) will see some grant recipients receive a higher grant payment every month.

 


The internet has made it easier to complete tasks, shopping and loads more. However, the South African Social Security Agency (Sassa) is facing challenges which is resulting in grant applicants having to travel to make grant applications.

 


When the South African Post Office (Sapo) announced that they would no longer be distributing the R350 grant, millions of South Africans wondered how they would access their money.


As a new month approaches, beneficiaries of grants in South Africa will be eligible to collect their money soon at post office branches around the country.

 


With around 46% of South Africa’s population benefiting from a social grant, the South African Social Security Agency (Sassa) has revealed how it has planned to ensure that grant recipients receive the necessary services as convenient as possible.

 


In a country with extreme levels of poverty and unemployment, an SMS from a governmental organisation known for providing grants to citizens may seem reputable, but this may not be the case.

 


The Post Office announced that they will no longer be distributing the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) R350 grant. This means millions of the grant's beneficiaries will now find a new way to collect their money.

 


While the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) R350 grant is seen as a vital support mechanism in assisting vulnerable members of our society, research has found that beneficiaries face many challenges before they can access their money.


More than 40% of South Africa’s population is reliant on grants from the South African Social Security Agency (Sassa). Here’s how to get your Sassa Grant payment schedule and how to know exactly when you can access your money. 


The South African Post Office (Sapo) have announced they will no longer distribute the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) R350 grant. So where does this leave R350 grant beneficiaries?


The Minister of Social Development has promised that Social Relief of Distress (SRD) R350 grant benefits will be paid by June 2022. This was revealed during the department's budget vote speech this week.

 


Social grants are a crucial mechanism for millions of vulnerable South Africans to ensure that they meet their basic needs. However, some individuals are attempting to take advantage of grant beneficiaries.

 


Every month, more than 10 million people benefit from the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) R350 grant. However, not all these beneficiaries have been paid for all the months they were approved for payment.

 


The latest announcement by the South African Post Office will see millions of grant beneficiaries change the way they receive their Social Relief of Distress (SRD) R350 grant every month.

 


The regulations under which the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) R350 grant is provided to citizens have changed. This change in regulations also coincided with a change in the qualifying criteria for the R350 grant.

 


Beneficiaries of the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) R350 grant will be able to start collecting their allocations for May this month at the Post Office.

 


It was recently revealed that all previous beneficiaries of the Social Relief of Distress R350 grant had to reapply for the crucial relief.

 


Planning to collect your grant at the post office this May? That may not be a good idea, here’s why.  

 


It was recently revealed that more than 3 000 government employees undeservedly benefited from grants provided by the South African Social Security Agency (Sassa).

 

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