Departments Wants Teachers Trained In Newly Introduced Subjects

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Research from Stellenbosch University suggests that around 45% of teachers will retire by 2030. To replace the loss of these teachers, tertiary education institutions will need to produce 50 000 teachers per year by 2030.

 


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The Funza Lushaka seeks to promote teaching as a profession among South Africans and provides bursaries to students wanting to become teachers. The bursary programme is designed to boost recruitment into teaching, especially in priority subject areas.

These priority subjects could change as the education department looks to introduce new subjects.

Questions have been raised as to whether the bursary policy is aligned to the needs of the Department of Basic Education (DBE). This is due to observations in some schools as teachers who were trained to specialise in one subject are having to teach a completely different subject at school.

“When universities submit their programmes in compliance with the policy, they must make sure they are in alignment with that policy and that cover a range of learning areas and scarce skills areas that Funza Lushaka will support students and allocate bursaries” explained the department.

The DBE is also planning to introduce new subjects, after  recently introducing coding and robotics in the school curriculum. It is believed these subjects will provide learners with the knowledge and skills to become inventors of new technologies to make a valuable contribution towards the global community.

The department encouraged universities to include some aspects of coding and robotics into their curriculum to equip students with knowledge around the subject matter which they can impart on learners.

“Two universities have developed short courses in coding and robotics and some of the lecturers are attending these courses. These two universities are also supporting the DBE in terms of teachers in service” explained the department.

 

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