KZN Rural Schools Feeling Impact Of Covid-19

Advertisement

Heading

On 27 October 2021, the matric class will sit down to write their English paper 1 exam. The matrics will be asked to answer the exact same question paper, even though many students have not had the same learning opportunities.


Advertisement

 


On 27 October 2021, the matric class will sit down to write their English paper 1 exam. The matrics will be asked to answer the exact same question paper, even though many students have not had the same learning opportunities.
Schools in rural areas around South Africa often have less infrastructure, a lack of electricity as well no internet connectivity to boost learning. Internet connectivity has become more important because during the Covid-19 lockdown, schools had to close. When learners did return, they attended school in a staggered approach to comply with social distancing rules.
Some affluent schools could transition to online learning. However, this was not possible for many schools in South Africa
Dr Khangelani Sibiya, a teacher at a rural school in Kwa-Zulu Natal says before the Covid-19 pandemic, it was easy to teach learners. He says it is not easy to teach now as the children believe that a large portion of learning time has been disrupted. While the department has put measures in place to minimise the impact of the pandemic on learning, a gap remains.
Sibiya said, “Our kids have a challenge because they have that understanding that there is a gap that is there, however, if we're looking at the system per se obviously it's very difficult because like myself I’m teaching grade 12 but then if I’m teaching grade 12 there are those things that they never covered in grade 11 and there's a huge gap”.
He explains that these gaps often lead to grade 12 teachers going back to grade 10 and grade 11 work in order to teach what needs to be taught in matric. He explains that even through all these challenges, the students need to fight to succeed.
This has seen an emphasis put on motivating learners in school. Part of this motivation for Sibiya is ensuring that the learners understand that this situation is not unique to KZN or South Africa but the whole world. This has led him to start a WhatsApp group in which he shares work with his students.

Advertisement


Advertisement


Advertisement



Advertisement




Advertisement


Advertisement