Matric Final Exams Kicks Off Tomorrow

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Around 890 000 Grade 12 learners will be participating in the upcoming National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations.


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Around 890 000 Grade 12 learners will be participating in the upcoming National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations.
In a statement released by the Department of Basic Education (DBE), they announced their confidence in hosting credible upcoming matric examinations. They are also ready to accommodate any changes should the current uncertain circumstances require them.
The National Professional Teachers' Organisation of South Africa’s (Naptosa) Basil Manual says the union shares the sentiments of the department. He says learners, along with their parents have done their part to minimise the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and the loss of teaching time.
Manual says that 2021 have been a catch-up year. He estimates that the current group of matriculants have only spent 50% of the 2020 academic year in classrooms. In an effort to fill the gaps caused by the pandemic, teachers and learners have had to contend with extended school days as well as attend extra classes.
“We'd like to believe that at this stage given the amount of time we've spent at school, that we've managed to catch up with the most important building blocks. Certain things are there for extension but the building blocks are important” said Manual.
He says he is confident that people have done what they needed to do during the preparation for the exams. He explains that all that is left now is for the learners to do their part. He said, “now it's up to the learners to get there to the exam room and to show us that our hard work is bearing fruit”.
The department also announced that new measures will be put in place to ensure the integrity of the examinations is upheld. Last year, a Physical Science paper was leaked and the department contemplated a nationwide rewrite.
Manual says that despite the measures put into place, it is up to the people to ensure act responsibly. He warns that if one exam paper is stolen, it could result in hundreds of thousands of students having to rewrite.

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