Parliament Sends Gender-Based Violence Bills To President For Consideration

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Earlier this month the National assembly passed 2 gender-based violence (GBV) bills. The bills will now be sent to President Cyril Ramaphosa and it is expected that he will sign these bills into law to combat GBV in South Africa.


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Earlier this month, the National assembly passed 2 gender-based violence (GBV) bills. The bills will now be sent to President Cyril Ramaphosa and it is expected that he will sign these bills into law to combat GBV in South Africa.
The three bills are the Domestic Violence Amendment Bil, Criminal Law Amendment Bill and the Criminal and Related Matters Amendment Bill.
Javu Baloyi, the Spokesperson for the Commission for Gender Equality, says should the legislation be implemented effectively, they will indeed make a difference. He says that if we have an implementation plan as a country we will win the war against GBV. He does caution that if you do not have a strategy for the implementation, the bills will amount to nothing.
“remember South Africa has got lots of legislation, but it's it boils down to the implementation and the monitoring thereof of those legislation so as a commission we were hopeful and we're optimistic”. Baloyi said.
He says that the police need to be effectively trained to deal with GBV cases. He explained, “we need to engage with the police to ensure as a commission that you know those that are being sent to deal with the gender-based violence crisis are not the novices we do not understand the intricacies and the seriousness of the scourge of Gender based violence in the country”.
The Domestic Violence Amendment bill now gives policemen the right to enter and search the houses where GBV may have been reported. It also allows for children to be interviewed.
He explains that this can be helpful. “It doesn't of course negate the issue that you know most of the violence that is happening in the country is happening behind closed doors where it away from the view of the public so it gives a lot of impetus in so far as you know the legislation is that people can be prosecuted on based on the balances of probabilities”.

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