Steps to manage change in the workplace

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Change is the only constant in life and in any organisation. Internal procedures
change, management could change, employees come and go or external factors such
as economic issues could effect change within an organisation.


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Change is the only constant in life and in any organisation. Internal procedures
change, management could change, employees come and go or external factors such
as economic issues could effect change within an organisation.
"Change will need to be managed correctly in order for an organisation to stay
balanced and for employees to stay motivated,' says Neville De Lucia New Business
Development Director at Dale Carnegie Gauteng. "Expectations will need to be set
because processes and people evolve in diverse ways as they undergo change.'

The Dale Carnegie Training Change Model can help managers prepare for change
and take a structured approach while ensuring a positive outcome.
Step 1: Establish a Motivation for Change
Change begins at the point when an organisation finds a motivation for change.
Change will need to be communicated to employees. The idea is to get employees on
board especially if the change consists of an organisation relocating, expanding or
management changes. On the other hand external factors such as resignations,
changes in economic conditions or changes in customer needs can also spark
change.
Step 2: Analyse the Situation
It?s important to take a step back and look at the pros and cons of any change
the organisation is about to embark, whether it?s planned or if it?s just about to
happen. Thoroughly analyse the risks and opportunities and find out what the
potential gain is as well as what the costs will be, if there are any. Weigh up the
risks of going ahead with the change versus the risk of not going ahead.
Step 3: Plan the Direction
Once you have determined that the opportunities outweigh the risk associated
with the change, begin to plan a way forward. Planning is vital as it determines
whether the change will be successful or not. Many initiatives fail due to poor
planning. Look at who the change will impact the most and prepare that person or
group of employees accordingly. Map out a plan for integrating the change into the
organisation and put together a review plan to measure the success.

Step 4: Implement the Change
Depending on the type and scope of the change, implementation could be
gradual or abrupt. Layoffs and acquisitions are implemented with little planning and
almost no warning while resignations and technological procedures are often phased
in over a period. At this stage communication from management to employees is
critical and maintaining an open and honest line of communication is important.
Ensure that the change is announced at an appropriate time and at the same time
promote the benefits of the change. If change is controlled always adhere to the
time fame in which the change has been scheduled for.
Step 5: Review the Direction
Continual monitoring of the change needs to take place throughout the
implementation. Progress of the change will not always result as planned and each
individual is also affected differently and not necessarily as anticipated. Managers
will need to observe and review each step of the process as well as measure the
effectiveness thereof. Measure weather the change is working as anticipated and if
the desired results are being produced. Communicate the findings to key team
members consistently during the review process.
Step 6: Adopt or Adjust
Once reviewed if the change is found to be effective and working out as
planned, the new concept, approach or process is adopted and becomes part of the
organisational norm. On-going review of the whole process is still to be conducted
continually. However, if the change is concluded to not be working as planned
adjustments will need to be made. Determine where the outcomes are failing short
and make adjustments by involving the relevant people.
"Top to bottom communication is vital when any kind of organisational change is
to take effect. It?s important to get employees involved in the process as they also
determine the success of the implementation,' explains De Lucia.

If you have any business-related questions or would like advice on other
workplace
issues, visit our website at

target="_new"> Dale Carnegie
or email us at [email protected].

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