TVET

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Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges, previously FET Colleges, provide students with after-school education should they not go on to attend a traditional university. TVET colleges offer courses in a wide variety of fields, with a focus on giving students marketable and practical skills. This is of great importance as there are many professions that society depends on and yet very few people are studying them. TVET colleges offer a popular alternative to university studies for students who were not accepted to study a degree. The number of TVET colleges is increasing rapidly, providing students with marketable skills and the ability to do essential jobs as artisans.


There are fifty registered and accredited public TVET Colleges in South Africa which operate on more than 264 campuses spread across the rural and urban areas of the country that you can choose from.


Do you have a mind for efficiency, great organisational skills, and a passion for systems and record keeping? If yes, then a career path in the office administration field is worth considering and one to think about. 


The Fourth Industrial Revolution, commonly referred to as 4IR is seen as the inevitable next step to how technology will drastically reshape entire economies and the education system. 


Last month, a Parliamentary Meeting was held to discuss the funding of higher education, especially after the implementation of the Special Adjustment Budget. Higher education remains protected, but what does this mean for TVET Colleges? 

 


As matriculants await National Senior Certificate results, its important that they know the options that they have post matric.

The Department of Higher Education and Training has mentioned that our country is in need of certain skills, and there is a massive shortage of artisans in South Africa. 

You might be considering to go to a TVET college for you vocational certificate, please read for further details.

 


 After completing school, many students would like to further their education. This in the hope of gaining skills that would make them employable in the South African job market.


Many people are still unaware of the study opportunities government has provided through public Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges.


TVET is an abbreviation for Technical and Vocational Education and Training and they provide practical education in skills and trades that are in demand in business and industry.


Terminology related to education in South Africa can often be very confusing, particularly when learners and prospective students need to consider the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) and talk of accreditation and registration.


Do you need financial assistance in order to study further? Pursuing a higher education through a Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College might be the answer.


The failure rate of new small businesses in South Africa is estimated between 70 % and 80%. This failure rate is among the highest in the world. 


Western and Northern Cape Regions hosted the first two of three Career Festivals as part of TVET month, on 21 and 22 of August.


False Bay TVET College is an active participant in the MOT Programme. This is a programme that originated in Norway and aims to give students certain tools to help them develop into strong and resilient members of society.


January 2019, the then Minister of Higher Education, Minister Naledi Pandor indicated that the Department of Higher Education and Training will support President Cyril Ramaphosa’s bold plan to create 257 000 job per annum by promoting entrepreneurship in the post-school sector.


False Bay TVET College, Khayelitsha Campus together with the Department of Small Business Development hosted a youth dialogue with College students.

 


A gender revolution has begun in what were exclusively male industries, led by a still-tiny vanguard of women artisans produced by South Africa’s TVET College system.


Despite the massive push to transform the image of TVET colleges it seems businesses are still hesitant to hire these graduates.


Winds of change will soon blow over the country’s Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges as the department in charge of these institutions wants to see them perform at a much higher level.

 


Entrepreneur Luvuyo Rani, owner of Silulo Ulutho Technologies in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, has been chosen as one of twelve 2016 Social Entrepreneurship winners by the Schwarb Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship.


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