arbitration

What are the policies that an employer should have in place to deal with allegations by an employee of sexual harassment? What steps should the employer take if they receive an allegation, and is dismissal always the correct disciplinary action? This week Ivan Israelstam provides guidance for employers.

There are a number of reasons why employers might suspend an employee. This week Ivan Israelstam deals with these questions: What are the reasons for suspension? What are the risks associated with each reason?

The CCMA Guidelines: Misconduct Arbitrations (The Guidelines) states that it is not unfair for employers to use third parties such as attorneys to chair disciplinary hearings. However, these highly important guidelines do not give disciplinary hearing chairpersons the right to conduct such hearings in a biased manner. The Guidelines oblige Commissioners to assess whether workplace dismissals are fair or unfair, and it is difficult to see how such dismissals can be fair if the presiding officer is biased and if it is shown that such bias results directly in prejudice to the employee.

 

This week Ivan Israelstam explains why it is important for an employer not only to refer bribery and corruption activities to the SAPS, but also to conduct an internal disciplinary hearing before terminating the services of an employee. 

Employers do sometimes find it difficult to prove at CCMA hearings the allegations they make against employees, who have been dismissed. One of the most common forms of evidence used in modern workplaces is camera videotape evidence.  However, this is not without problems. This week Ivan Israelstam quotes cases where the camera videotape type evidence has been challenged.  

Once a dispute has been lodged with the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA). there are different stages in the process to achieve resolution: conciliation, or con-arb - conciliation and arbitration, or arbitration. This week Ivan Israelstam explains how a pre-arbitration meeting may assist in speeding up resolution - but also points to the risk involved.

Employers need to make sure that they understand the implications of receiving a Con-Arb notice from the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA).  This week Ivan Israelstam explains what the ConArb involves and how employers need to prepare.

"Don't miss the arbitration hearing! It may well continue without you." Good advice from Ivan Israelstam this week. But what should you do if you didn't receive the notice of the arbitration hearing? Ivan explains how to proceed with a rescission application.   

At some time or other, most employers are faced with the decision on whether dishonesty by an employee warrants dismissal. This week Ivan Israelstam explains what the Code of Good Practice Dismissal requires employers to take into account. Ivan also explains the importance of mitigating factors that need to be taken into account before an employer makes the decision to dismiss.

  

Why is is important that disciplinary action takes place timeously? This week Ivan Israelstam explains how difficult it is to prove that the trust relationship has been broken sufficient to warrant dismissal - if the disciplinary procedure was delayed and the employee was allowed to continue working.

Ivan Israelstam explains the many ways that communication can go astray between the CCMA and the employer - and the very expensive consequences of the mis-communication.  This week Ivan explains why it is essential for business owners and executives to take labour law seriously and ensure that all management and supervisory levels understand how to manage employees within the law. 

What should an employer do if they believe that a Commision for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) arbitrator has behaved inappropriately, or failed to take into account all aspects of the case, or otherwise misdirected themselves and come to an incorrect conclusion? Ivan Israelstam uses a number of cases to provide examples of how employers have taken up challenges to the the decisions of CCMA Commissioners in the Labour Court.  

What is the procedure for an arbitration? Must I take my witnesses along with me? Must I take the evidence - the documents/video recordings along to the CCMA with me? This week Ivan Israelstam makes clear exactly how the CCMA Commissioner will run the arbitration.  The following questions are answered: who speaks first, what do the participants present, what is the role of the witnesses, and how is the evidence presented?  

How does the dispute resolution system work in South Africa? New employers and new employees in the human resources, personnel, and industrial relations fields, as well as students will find the explanation by Ivan Israelstam this week very useful.   

Ivan Israelstam

Many employers will be able to relate to the situation of being infurirated by employee behaviour. However, as Ivan Israelstam explains this week, it is very dangerous for an employer to react emotionally and overstate the allegation of misconduct - by alleging dereliction of duty. This term has a very specific legal meaning and therefore at the CCMA the employer will have the responsibility for proving that the misconduct was a deliberate and intentional action by the employee.

Labour brokers - or temporary employment services (TES) - provide staff to companies, but sometimes fail to realise that they are also bound by the rquirements of labour law as employer. In addition to the legislation there may also be additional bargaining council determinations, which set conditions such as minimum wage rates. This week Ivan Israelstam explains how the CCMA has decided dismissal arbitrations involving labour brokers.

This week Ivan Israelstam expresses his view that the employer’s right to dismiss has been weakened. He explains how the Sidumo matter proceeded through various courts ultimately ending in a Constitutional Court decision, which provides the standard for employers to adhere to when deciding upon a dismissal sanction.

This week Ivan Israelstam says: "without proof your case goes poof!" Arguing your case vehemently but without any substantiating evidence will not win your case - no matter how good your debating skills. What is required to win your case at a CCMA or bargaining council arbitration is evidence. Ivan explains that evidence may be presented via witnesses, documents, video, or recordings, and outlines the process at arbitration.

Employers who hold senior positions in multi-national and national organisations may hold an arrogant belief that the CCMA Commissioner will believe their testimony against that of a junior employee. Ivan Israelstam explains why this approach could lead to the company losing the arbitration.

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