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CCMA

how to prepare for a CCMA hearing

Need to prepare for a hearing at the CCMA? Here's a guide for first-timers attending a conciliation-arbitration hearing to walk you through all the steps.

What should an employer do when an employee is absent from the workplace for an extended period? What is the attitude of the CCMA if an employer dismisses the employee in his/her absence? What constitututes a resignation by an employee? There are many permutations to these questions. This week Ivan Israelstam points to some of the dangers in these cases, and cautions employers not to act in anger or in haste.

The Code of Good Practice on Dismissal (Schedule 8 of the Labour Relations Act) provides the guidelines for employers to follow in disciplinary proceedings. This code does not specifically require "cross-examination" but does provide that the employee must be aware of the allegations against them, to understand them, and be given a chance to state their side of the story - or defence - in response to the allegations.This week Ivan Israelstam explains the meaning of "cross-examination" and provides advice on how employers should proceed.

The South African Constitution provides employees with the right to fair labour practices. Prior to a dismissal decision an employee should be made aware of the allegations against him/her and given chance to be heard on the matter.

Employers are sometimes disappointed and angry that a CCMA arbitration award has gone against them. This week Ivan Israelstam explains why this sometimes occurs, and what the standards are that CCMA Commissioners must meet. Ivan explains how this helps an employer deciding whether they should challenge the award.

In the past, employers has consistently refused to allow lawyers to be present at internal disciplinary hearings. However, the ground has shifted slightly and employers would be well advised to consider the individual circumstances and individual disciplinary matter that is being heard. This week Ivan Israelstam explains how the ground has shifted.

In any workplace there will be grievances from time to time. Employers may think that because there is no specific labour law describing how to handle grievances, that employee grievances may be ignored. However, where there is a pattern of grievances over a period of time employers are well advised to take these seriously, and investigate the circumstances of each complaint. Failure to do so may lead to various adverse effects upon the employer. Ivan Israelstam explains further.

This week Ivan Israelstam explains why employers and managers are well-advised to ensure that they understand exactly what employee entitlements are under the Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA). In addition, when hearing dismissal disputes under the Labour Relations Act (LRA), the CCMA may also allow employment conditions under the BCEA to be heard with the dismissal matter.

This week Ivan Israelstam says: "without proof your case goes poof!" Arguing your case vehemently but without any substantiating evidence will not win your case - no matter how good your debating skills. What is required to win your case at a CCMA or bargaining council arbitration is evidence. Ivan explains that evidence may be presented via witnesses, documents, video, or recordings, and outlines the process at arbitration.

Employers may be surprised to find that there are costs that may accrue when they fail to follow correct disciplinary procedures in dismissing employees. There may be Conflict Dispute Resolution Centre - attached to Bargaining Councils (CDR) or Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) costs. This week Ivan Israelstam explains what the potential costs are when employers fail to follow the requirements for dismissing employees for a fair reason and following a fair procedure.

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