CCMA

Human resource practitioners will be aware of the saying that one employs for qualifications and dismisses for behaviour. Individuals who have been model employees may suddenly start behaving in uncharacteristic ways, brought on by personal relationship problems, trauma, or forms of physical or mental illness. No matter how frustrating the behaviour may be for the employer Ivan Israelstam explains why it is critical that employers behave correctly.

What are the required notice periods when an employee resigns? What rights does an employer have when an employee simply gives "instant" notice - or fails to work in their notice? How should an employer respond? These are the questions that Ivan Israelstam deals with this week.

Ivan Israelstam

It is often very difficult for employers to provide sufficient proof to the CCMA or bargaining council commissioner that the employee is guilty of the misconduct for which he was dismissed. The employer has the full onus (legal responsibility) of proving that the dismissal is fair. Employers often believe that video or camera footage will provide sufficient evidence for a dismissal. This week Ivan Israelstam explains the complexities involved in using this technology in disciplinary hearings.

Newly appointed supervisors and managers do sometimes find difficulty in understanding what is meant by a "fair labour practice". As Ivan Israelstam explains in this article, it is not quite as simple to identify what is unfair as it is to identify what is illegal in criminal law. This article sets out very plainly the questions managers and supervisors should ask themselves to determine whether their actions will be seen as "fair" - or unfair

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