corruption

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Ministers, deputy ministers and parliamentarians will be pleased after President Cyril Ramphosa accepted recommendations which will result in an increase in their remuneration. However, the move has not been well received.

 


A Constitutional Court decision which absolved the government from honouring a multi-year public sector wage increase was taken on the chin by unions and workers alike. However, the fight for increases has just begun with a 10% increase being demanded.

 


After strikes from e-hailing drivers and a provincial taxi strike in the Western Cape, South Africa’s public transport system could soon find itself under major strain after a union revealed that a nationwide bus strike could be on the horizon. 

 


The Constitutional Court's dismissal, in late February 2022, of the public service unions' appeal over the 2018 wage agreement with the South African government marks the end of a long legal battle that began in 2018. 


A tough next round of wage negotiations has been set up after public sector unions lost a court bid that will see their members lose out on the third year increases of the collective wage agreement reached in 2018.


Unions are set to strike at the offices of the Department of Public Enterprises as workers are unhappy with alleged corruption and mismanagement taking place at the national carrier.


Just months after the 2021 Local Government Elections (LGE) , a Northern Cape Municipality is being accused of not paying workers salaries.


After a court bid to halt the hanging over of the Zondo report was dismissed, President Cyril Ramaphosa received part one of the State Capture Commission of Enquiry’s findings.


Earlier this year it was revealed that more than R200 million in relief grants were paid to government employees.


 One of the criticisms of South Africa’s battle against corruption is that little action is taken against the individuals implicated in corrupt activities.


President Cyril Ramaphosa says that there is a long way to go when it comes to instilling a culture of ethics in South Africa’s public service. This comes after it was revealed that around 16,000 government employees irregularly received the Covid-19 R350 Social Relief of Distress grant.


It is estimated that the country could have R676 billion in additional revenue if not for corruption. And with the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) announcing that it has dismissed the application for the 2021 local government elections to be postponed to February next year, South Africans will go to the polls before the end of the year.


 After causing much chaos in the days leading to his arrest, former President Jacob Zuma has thrown in the towel. 


An internal investigation into a tender worth millions has put Health Minister, Dr Zweli Mkhize in the spotlight. 


The media often features stories of bribery and corruption. Employers often simply assume - or hope - that these activities happen elsewhere. However, employers would be well served to follow Ivan Israelstam's guidance on what constitutes these activities - how they are defined, and how they should be managed professionally.

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