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disciplinary procedure

Ivan Israelstam

Before embarking on disciplinary procedures in serious cases of misconduct, employers often question whether the action is enough to warrant dismissal. One of the key factors in this decision is whether the trust relationship has been broken. This week Ivan Israelstam explains why this factor is important.

Ivan Israelstam

The term ‘shop steward’ is a colloquial one and refers to the employee elected as the workplace representative by fellow employees who belong to the relevant trade union. The Labour Relations Act (LRA) officially refers to shop stewards as “trade union representatives”, and section 14 of the LRA gives these representatives (shop stewards) a number of special rights.

Ivan Israelstam

Employees and union officials sometimes allege that an employer is trying to "work an employee out", that is making life so uncomfortable that the employee will choose to leave and find work elsewhere. However, in South Africa with such extremely high levels of unemployment, alternative jobs are not easy to come by. As a result employees will remain with the company and put up with the unfair treatment - or alternatively, resign and allege that they had no alternative course of action - that the employer effectively caused the termination.

Newly appointed supervisors and managers do sometimes find difficulty in understanding what is meant by a "fair labour practice". As Ivan Israelstam explains in this article, it is not quite as simple to identify what is unfair as it is to identify what is illegal in criminal law. This article sets out very plainly the questions managers and supervisors should ask themselves to determine whether their actions will be seen as "fair" - or unfair

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