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labour brokers

This week Ivan Israelstam questions whether the parties at the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC) are meeting their collective responsibility to the nation.  NEDLAC is a statutory body established at the start of the new South African post-apartheid dispensation - in 1994. NEDLAC is intended to achieve public participation in the labour market, providing input to socio-economic policy and the attendant legislation. NEDLAC is responsible for a range of issues.

Ivan Israelstam expresses the opinion that labour laws are restrictive and that although the intention is to help employees, the effect is to increase unemployment.

There are a number of ways that employers attempt to avoid agreeing permanent contracts with employees, for example: the use of fixed term contracts, or contracting with labour brokers to provide workers. Ivan Israelstam suggests that these actions are a reaction to difficulties in the ability of employers to dismiss permanent employees. He quotes cases to illustrate this point. 

This week Ivan Israelstam pays attention to the use of labour brokers and temporary employment service agencies (TES). There are many reasons why employers make this decision on how to fill their company needs. But are there risks to using these services, instead of employing people on the company payroll as permanent employees? Read on for further details.  

Ivan Israelstam

This week Ivan Israelstam makes the case that labour law has become more restrictive upon employers. He explains that those who have used repeated fixed term contracts should no longer do that - only employ on a fixed term contract where there is a genuine short term job. Secondly, using labour brokers - TES or temporary employment services - has also become more restrictive and difficult as a result of the latest labour law amendments.

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