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This week Ivan Israelstam provides his interpretation of the Constitutional section of the Bill of Rights providing that "Everyone is equal before the law". Does "Everyone" include a juristic person - that is an employer. He goes on to explain how the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) and the Labour Court have responded to his opinion.

This week Ivan Israelstam explains exactly why employers who have disciplinary procedures - and put those disciplinary procedures in the employee's contract - need to make absolutely sure that they follow exactly the procedures that have been set out. The Labour Court will take a dim view of employers who simply make minimal effort to ensure that the procedures are followed.

"I'll give you a warning". That is something heard by employees, when a supervisor or manager makes the statement as a threat because they are frustrated with the behaviour or non-compliance of an employee. This week Ivan Israelstam explains exactly how warnings should be viewed, and when different levels of warning are appropriate. 

This week Ivan Israelstam explains what these terms of the Labour Relations Act section 213 mean - economic, technological, structural or similar needs of the employer.

When business conditions change, employers may want to change the terms and conditions of employment of the employees. This week Ivan Israelstam explains what employers should not do in these circumstances. 

Over the last few decades, many companies have transferred parts of a business to another company, which continues to provide a service to the original company. Transfers of the employees takes place under Section 197 of the Labour Relations Act. If the company subsequently decides to cancel that arrangement and appoints another company to provide the service, do all of the employees move over again? Ivan explains the complexities and implications of this question.

When should the chairperson of an internal disciplinary hearing consider allowing a lawyer to represent the employee facing the disciplinary hearing? Ivan Israelstam explains how the courts have considered this question, and what employers should take into account in order to respond to such requests. 

You can be an employee before you start work! This week Ivan Israelstam explains that there gap in employent law. That is because neither the Labour Relations Act, nor Basic Conditions of Employment Act, nor the Employment Equity Act adequately cover this question. Ivan advises on the limitations in finding a way forward by relying upon the law of contract. So, Ivan explains how have the Labour Court, and Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) have responded - and the Labour Appeal Court has stepped in.

One of the unfortunate consequences for employees of this outbreak of corona virus, is potential retrenchment. This week Ivan explains the benefits offered by the Department of Employment and Labour to mitigate this eventuality, and reminds employers of the importance of following the consultation steps as set our in the retrenchment clauses of the Labour Relations Act. 

The retrenchment of a senior management employee will always be a difficult exercise, and all the more reason why the employer should ensure compliance with the Labour Relations Act and Codes of Good Practice, and that the correct procedures are followed. Ivan Israelstam quotes a case where the employer tried to both retrench and disciplline a senior employee.

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