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Workplaces don’t look the way they used to. But even as businesses have mostly adopted a hybrid approach where people juggle working remotely, many employers are eager to bring their staff back to the office on a permanent basis.

 


As organisation leaders get to grips with another challenging year, it is important to create nurturing and supportive environments to achieve long-term success and resilience. 


Despite South Africa’s employment equity legislation, the biases and discrimination that characterised the ‘old South Africa’ still exists in the hearts and minds of many people.


In my experience, the corporate environment today is a much more enabling one for women than in the past. Even though the gender breakdown still favours men, the general attitude towards women has certainly changed for the better. Of course, there are still some men who find it difficult to take orders from women, but I do not think that is ever going to completely go away.


Employers use alternative and temporary labour sources for numerous reasons including:


Conservatively estimated, one in four women will experience sexual harassment in the workplace at some stage during their working lifespan. The personal toll on these women - and those around them who deal with the secondary effects - is immense.


An integral element of an employment relationship is the need for and the right of the employer and employee to trust each other. This is a two-way street and either party could forgo his/her right to continue the employment by destroying the trust relationship.


Section 158 of the Labour Relations Act (LRA) gives the Labour Court the power to issue interdicts preventing employers, employees or trade unions from proceeding with threatened or current actions. 

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