Women in Business

Women usually take a break from their careers because of personal reasons like: starting a family; attending to a loved one either in old age or sickness; getting married or relocating.

The popular TV series Mad Men tells the fictional stories of the cutthroat advertising industry in the 1960s. 

In the financial services industry, as seniority level increases, diversity declines. 

Skills that women bring to the table, once called soft skills, are now recognised as both profitable and essential. It is critical, then, to consider the impact of the Fourth Industrial Revolution on women in the workplace.

An article by Forbes, The Pressure Is Real For Working Mothers, states that “43% of highly qualified women opt out or off-ramp on their way back to work post-baby.” 

South African business has a serious diversity problem - only 3.3% of listed companies have female CEOs and 85% of CEOs are white, despite an increase from 2018.

As we begin National Women’s Month in South Africa, I have taken some time to reflect on the interactions I have had with strong successful women during the past seven years of training and coaching.

The year so far has been a good one for South African companies on the gender transformation front, with statistics seemingly moving in the right direction for the first time in recent history

Research shows that having women in leadership roles helps companies perform better financially, and companies in Africa have certainly adopted this approach. 

No country can flourish by neglecting the potential of its women workforce. With economic liberalisation and globalisation, the number of women entrepreneurs is increasing globally.

Are you, or do you know of, a black woman owned beverage business, which is looking to grow in technical expertise, sustainable revenue

 

 

The benefits of women in the workplace are even greater than originally thought, according to a new study by the International Monetary Fund. 

Annual statistics for top leadership placements show that South African companies are taking gender transformation more seriously than ever before, with more women than men landing management and senior leadership roles for the first time last year.

 

 

The benefits of women in the workplace are even greater than originally thought, according to a new study by the International Monetary Fund. 

International Women’s Day has a provocative theme this year – Balance for better and encourage action. Presumably, balance is currently poor and action is needed for women to reach their goals.

In commemoration of the 1956 Women’s March to the Union Buildings, the Southern African Institute of Learning (SAIL) today launched their 1956 Women’s Business Empowerment Programme. 

 

“Stress is the trash of modern life-we all generate it but if you don't dispose of it properly, it will pile up and overtake your life.” ― Danzae Pace

“I don't mind living in a man's world, as long as I can be a woman in it” said Marilyn Monroe. Business Women require a dynamic and specialised skill set, while still enhancing womanhood which this interactive course promises. 

The success of any woman in business, whether it is in a corporate role or as an entrepreneur, is the simple willingness and desire to continuously develop their own skills. 

Despite South Africa’s ongoing push for gender transformation in senior positions, the number of female leaders at SA’s top companies remains exactly the same as it was in 2015, and has even dropped since 2012, new research shows.

Women’s month is a good time to share a secret … recent events give women executives a big opportunity to fulfill their potential as key contributors.

On South Africa’s Women’s Day, Baker McKenzie lawyer Bridgett Majola, a senior associate in the Banking & Finance Practice of the firm’s Johannesburg office, shares her advice for women and what she would tell a younger version of herself:

Are you starting your career? As a woman you may be in search of some direction to help you reach your professional goals. Get advice from working women at the top of their field.

On a global scale women earn 15% less than men but the reason why is more complex than an unfair wage discrepancy.

Faith Popcorn, the Nostradamus of Marketing and most accurate futurist, called it out in her book, “Eve”olution in 2000 about how women would rise and revolutionise society.

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