Skills Development

Skills Development in South Africa is governed under the Skills Development Act 97 of 1998, which has subsequently been amended a number of times. The national government's Department of Higher Education and Training is responsible for managing and developing all higher education and skills development training. The current Minister is Dr Blade Nzimande.

The Tshepo 1 Million programme has ushered in a season of hope for the youth of Gauteng, with over 473 000 young people having benefitted to date.

Cabinet has approved the Public Service Graduate Recruitment Scheme Framework.

Public Service and Administration Minister Faith Muthambi has reassured community development workers (CDWs) that government is committed to skilling them in order to effectively serve the people.

Are you passionate about business and personal development? Find out how you can get expert training.

With South Africa’s unemployment rate at an all-time high, Learnerships are necessary to help build a competent workforce as well as the key to boosting an organisation’s B-BBEE levels in the process.

The skills deficit in South Africa needs to be addressed to boost employment and tackle income inequality says CIMA.

The purpose of skills development is to facilitate access to, mobility and progression within career paths through high quality education and training.

The African Leadership University ALU and GE Africa announced today the launch of the ALU Africa Industrial Internet Program.

Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa says young people need to be given an enabling environment in order to access employment opportunities.

Why Skills Development Matters

South Africa contributes a large portion of its national budget towards education and skills development. Let's take a look at why that is and why training is so important.

Absa has collaborated with Lulaway to train 4 000 youth on the Absa ‘ReadytoWork’ programme and place 2 000 of these young people in employment.

Learnerships raise the skills base in key economic sectors and reduce unemployment driven by a shortage of skills, yet many employers ignore them in spite of significant tax incentives.

Sometimes we get lost in the flood of negative news, but here we have evidence of people working towards their delivery mandate: to provide focused skills development initiatives to women, people with disabilities, youth, rural and township communities, and military veterans. The CETA Annual Report provides evidence that it is possible to deliver and achieve a clean audit in the process. A worthy legacy for ex DHET Minister Nzimande. 

The 2017 PPS Student Confidence Index (SCI)* found that 80% of South African students feel that their degree sufficiently prepares them for their chosen profession.

The critical skills gap that exists in South Africa is a growing concern for many industries. One would assume, to combat this concerning lack of critical skills, employers would be investing more in learning and development (L&D). However, according to the annual Deloitte Human Capital Trends Report, the opposite is true.

For the second year running, Otis Southern Africa has awarded its top mechanic for expertise in product and safety aptitude and ability.

The National Skills Authority (NSA) has prepared a video explaining their mandate, and how the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) under Minister Nzimande has worked to improve the contribution 

The City of Cape Town, Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA) and the False Bay Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College recently launched a multi-million rand skills development programme for 91 residents from Blikkiesdorp who will receive construction industry training at False Bay TVET College in Westlake.

The Transport Education Training Authority (TETA) SETA Discretionary Grant window for 2018/2019 is currently opened.

The future well-being of the country depends on raising a generation of skilled, competent, and responsible adults.

An integrated, robust effort from the public and private sector is required to boost employment levels among the country’s disabled workforce.

A unique associate programme has been designed to address the growing challenge of graduate unemployment.

In terms of the Skills Development Regulation, a Discretionary Grant is a grant paid to applicants at the discretion of the Safety & Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA), for Skills Development Projects, linked to scarce and critical skills, in the Safety and Security Sector.

A team of 20 students, selected by the Department of Higher Education, are set to compete at the upcoming 44th World Skills International (WSI) biennial competition at Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates.

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