Youth Development

Advertisement

Youth Development is essential to helping the youth of South Africa succeed in life. There are far more prospective workers than there are jobs available for them, and many youth are not able to afford to study further and become more specialised. This is where youth development programmes come in. Offering young people work readiness programmes, opportunities to advance their education and make a difference in their communities are just some of the ways that youth development can change South Africa for the better.


Evolving technology and the impacts of Covid-19 have resulted in workplaces that are changing faster than ever. To keep pace with the rapid advances in the workplace and avoid skills shortages, almost half of employees will need to be reskilled with critical skills by 2025.


The global pandemic has disrupted all aspects of life, and across the world people have relied heavily and ever-increasingly on technology and digital tools to strive for continuity in education, work, and relationships. 


Volunteering can most certainly help you get a job. There is a growing trend among universities to produce graduates that are practically prepared for the workplace and fully equipped to lead in every sector.


Microsoft and non-profit social enterprise, Tech4Dev have partnered on the Women Techsters Initiative to train girls and women across Africa in coding and deep tech skills, aiming to bridge the digital and technology divide and ensure equal access to opportunities across the continent.


The newly launched Pace Commerce and Entrepreneurship School of Specialisation in Jabulani, Soweto, is set to address skills shortages and create a skilled labour force.


Vuyile Ngqulunga has made significant strides to realise her ambition of becoming a “strong, independent black woman”.


The School of Hard Knocks (SOHK) in the Western Cape has taken the initiative to contribute to addressing South Africa’s youth unemployment challenge by providing courses that assist youth to enter the job market.


Government is committed to a skills revolution that will ensure that South Africa has the human capital required in the digital economy, says President Cyril Ramaphosa.


Through its Thuso Fund, the MySchool MyVillage MyPlanet community loyalty programme is funding the essential upgrade of the hardware and software for the Learn to Earn Graphic Design Training course. 


Having declared youth unemployment as a crisis, President Cyril Ramaphosa on Sunday appealed to young people to not give up hope for a brighter future with government’s assistance.


Mohau Kwebu had many challenges growing up, including having a mother with a mental disability and an absent father, but he was determined to realise his dream of becoming a visual arts storyteller.


Government says it remains committed to advancing the youth agenda and recognises the importance of youth activism in driving economic growth.


Youth-led non-profit organisation, Enabling Disability Education Nationally (EDEN), is preparing for the second edition of its Walk For Youth Disability Education (#Walk4YDE19


Twenty-five years of democracy and freedom presents South Africa’s youth with an opportunity to celebrate the role played by young people during the struggle for liberation.


“This is an opportunity that I’m hoping will take me far,” says Lebogang Sothoane.


About 160 000 unemployed youth in KwaZulu-Natal are set to benefit from an investment of R7.9 billion in new training programmes.

Advertisement


Advertisement


Advertisement



Advertisement




Advertisement


Advertisement