Work Permit

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The starting point when bringing in a foreign specialist into your business is the Critical Skills List, which notes the professions where Home Affairs issues Work Permits due to areas where there are shortages of skills.


Given the growth in Africa, employers are regularly seconding their employees to businesses in other jurisdictions.


It is not difficult to observe in Global and South African media that the South African Government is ambivalent over the current state of our immigration policy, laws and service delivery.


To help the country ensure the effective and efficient management of
migration, newly appointed Home Affairs Minister Malusi Gigaba recently
outlined the Immigration Regulations of 2014.


The Forum of Immigration Practitioners (FIPSA) has declared that the new
Immigration Regulations, published on 23rd May, contain an array of
shortcomings which effectively make it impossible to apply for a work visa or
other visa.


Foreign nationals working for your local company who don?t confirm their
employment to Home Affairs or have overstayed on a visa could put you and
your business at serious risk.


The Department of Home Affairs says it has noted recent reports in print and
online media on the looming expiration of permits issued to Zimbabwean
nationals under the special dispensation period.


New visa rules issued by Home Affairs, applicable to foreigners who need to
execute short-term projects in South Africa, will put R1 billion in investment
and 1600 local jobs in jeopardy.


The concept of cross-border employment is growing in popularity as skills shortages continue to plague the country but many businesses and individuals are unaware of the legalities surrounding foreign workers. Manpower MD, Peter Winn talks about the intricacies of moving and employing staff globally.


The Department of Home Affairs? issuing of works permits to Zimbabwean nationals, under its recent Zimbabwe Dispensation Project, has inflated the number of work permits issued by the department to foreigners, with over 65 000 issued in the first quarter of this fiscal year.


The confusion around current immigration issues in South Africa continues as Home Affairs announces that Zimbabweans will no longer be given a special concessionary permit which allows them to work, study or conduct business on a visitor?s visa. Information is available for HR managers and other employers who need to know about the changes.


Foreigners who live and work in South Africa may be concerned that they will have to renounce citizenship of other countries if they wish to apply for South African citizenship.
South Africa permits dual citizenship, which allows easier access into other countries for those who want to conduct business or work freely in several parts of the globe. However, it is important for travellers who have dual citizenship to be aware that they must always use their South African passport when entering or leaving South Africa.


South Africa, like most countries, allows non-nationals to change from temporary status to permanent residence, provided they meet government criteria. Some situations where a foreigner can apply for direct permanent residence include when they have the relevant work permit, a business permit, when they have relatives who are citizens, and a number of other cases.


The consequences of having the incorrect work permit for South Africa can be serious: a foreigner may lose a job when a work permit has to be redone; be unable to open a banking account or obtain finance, or be restricted in applying for permanent residence. Leon Isaacson explains the different types of work permits available for those looking into immigration visas.


The qualifications authority, Saqa, has found that almost 60% of the foreign qualifications they evalute are from Zimbabweans. For nine months last year almost 10 000 Zimbabweans were applying for work permits and required recognition of their qualifications to obtain skilled positions in South Africa.

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