Contributors

What are employee entitlements to sick leave? How should an employer handle the various forms of illness? These could be physical, emotional, mental illnesses. This week Ivan explains how an employer should approach employees with an extended, or recurring mental or emotional illness.  

Sometimes employees do come in to work and declare that they are resigning with immediate effect. This can be for a number of personal reasons, irritation with management, and so on.  This week Ivan Israelstam explains the potential implications for employers when this occurs.

There is a need for assessors and moderators to be qualified and registered. Many in the education sector seem to overlook the distinction between these two terms.

Employers do sometimes find it difficult to prove at CCMA hearings the allegations they make against employees, who have been dismissed. One of the most common forms of evidence used in modern workplaces is camera videotape evidence.  However, this is not without problems. This week Ivan Israelstam quotes cases where the camera videotape type evidence has been challenged.  

When employers are faced with financial challenges, and contemplate retrenching employees, it is critical for the employer to first consult on alternatives to avoid retrenchment. Ivan Israelstam explains what is required, and how employers should consider alternatives. If the employee makes proposals, which the employer does not accept, it is necessary that the employer provides a response on why the alternative proposed is not a viable option.    

This week Ivan Israelstam points out that the CCMA and bargaining councils do have the jurisdiction to decide upon retrenchment disputes, if there is a failure to agree at conciliation. This arises from the amendments to the Labour Relations Act in 2002. It is critical that employers follow a fair procedure and not simply go ahead with retrenchments without engaging in a fair consultation process.  

This week Ivan Israelstam gives examples of fair discrimination.  Then explains how one employer was able to successfully defend against an allegation of unfair discrimination, and another employer could not defend against a dismissal that was found to be an automatically unfair dismissal. 

The sale of a business - or part of a business - may take place when a company is in financial difficulty, and wanting to restructure to avoid going into liquidation.  The new owner may want to reduce the staff complement - but the Labour Relations Act makes any retrenchment as a result of a transfer of a going concern an unfair dismissal. Who is responsible - the old or new employer? Ivan Israelstam explains further.

This week Ivan Israelstam explains why labour brokers must change focus in order to remain viable businesses. The Constitutional Court has clarified that the client is now responsible for workers, who have worked for the client for more than three months. Even though they may be provided by labour brokers, those workers must be treated on equal terms with the comparable permanent workers. 

Employers may be relieved when an employee confesses to some misdemeanour, and assume that a dismissal will then automatically be justified.  This week Ivan Isrealstam explains why this is not so. There are a number of reasons why an employer cannot simply go ahead and dismiss the employee. 

This week Ivan Israelstam provides examples from the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitrator and the Labour Court to explain the complexity of decisions on what may be considered as an unfair labour practice.  

This week Ivan Israelstam explains how the word "unfair" is interpreted in labour law, and why it is so important for employers to understand what is regarded as unfair and what is automatically unfair. This is particularly important for employers to understand in relation to reasons for dismissal.

Once a dispute has been lodged with the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA). there are different stages in the process to achieve resolution: conciliation, or con-arb - conciliation and arbitration, or arbitration. This week Ivan Israelstam explains how a pre-arbitration meeting may assist in speeding up resolution - but also points to the risk involved.

As the economy fails to grow and consumers struggle to make ends meet, businesses may suffer a loss of sales and profits.  May the employer automatically retrench workers? This week Ivan Israelstam examines the requirements upon an employer before they consider retrenching employees.    

The word prejudice is used a great deal in the media, but there are certain legal implications of prejudice, prejudging, and implications for bias in disciplinary proceedings. Therefore, it is very important for employers to understand the dangers in not paying attention to these legal concepts. This week Ivan Israelstam explains the different meanings of these words, and how they are important for disciplinary proceedings, and for conducting matters at the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA).

Employers sometimes know that misconduct has definitely taken place, but the employer can’t pinpoint the actual culprit/s. The temptation is to dismiss every employee, who may have possibly been involved. This week ivan Israelstam deals with cases where this has happened.

Employers need to make sure that they understand the implications of receiving a Con-Arb notice from the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA).  This week Ivan Israelstam explains what the ConArb involves and how employers need to prepare.

This week Ivan Israelstam explains that employees have many rights, but there is also a fiduciary duty towards the employer.  He explains what this means, and why there is a stronger duty to be trustworthy upon the more senior the employee.  

 

Good practices during recruitment of new employees are critical to business success. One key issue is to obtain relevant documentary evidence of qualifications and the employer has the responsibility to ensure that the documents, such as qualifications and licences are genuine. Obtaining a history of the potential employee's past work experience may be more difficult and what will be considered relevant to the position may not always be clear.  This week Ivan Israelstam explains the complexities in establishing what is relevant. 

This week Ivan Israelstam looks at the Labour Relations and Employment Equity Acts to find the definition of workplace "victimisation". He answers a number of questions: What does this term mean? What actions by an employer could constitute victimisation? What are the implications for a constructive dismissal claim?

Employers generally are now respecting an employee's right to a disciplinary hearing before deciding upon dismissal.  The question is: who chairs the disciplinary hearing, that is: who is the presiding officer of the disciplinary hearing? How important is it that the presiding officer has not been involved in the events leading up to the disciplinary hearing? This week Ivan Israelstam answers these questions.

When will it be fair to dismiss an employee for poor performance? What is poor performance? What are the employer's rights in setting the performance standard and what are the employer's responsibility towards employees?  This week Ivan Israelstam responds to these critical questions that apply to all employers and explains what the employer will need to be able to demonstrate to a CCMA commissioner in an unfair dismissal arbitration. 

Employers do complete employment contracts before the person commences work, but does that make the person an employee? What are the implications is the employer decides to terminate the contract even before the person has commenced work? This week Ivan Israestam deals with these interesting labour law questions. 

Retrenchment consultations are potentially emotional and difficult discussions. This week Ivan Israelstam explains whether employees involved in a retrenchment consultation have a right to bring in a lawyer or other external labour law representative. 

Employers may suspend an employee in a number of circumstances, some are reasonable and fair, but others may simply be as a result of an employer trying to make life difficult for an employee so that the employee will resign.  This week Ivan Israelstam explains all the various circumstances of suspensions.

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